25 C
Jaipur
Thursday, December 3, 2020

One American, two Russians blast off to International Space Station – Latest News

Must read

Twitter Now Supports Hardware Security Keys on Android and iOS

2020 was certainly not a great year for Twitter’s security team, case in point: the infamous high-profile Twitter Bitcoin scam. To recover from this...

FAU-G Records Over 1 Million Pre-Registrations in Just 24 Hours on Android

While the ministry is giving PUBG officials a cold shoulder, the game’s Atmanirbhar rival, FAU-G, is gearing up for a mammoth launch later this...

A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying a U.S. astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts successfully reached the International Space Station after blasting off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, live footage broadcast by Russia’s space agency Roscosmos showed.

The Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft carrying NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, a microbiologist who in 2016 became the first person to sequence DNA in space, and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov reached the space station roughly three hours after liftoff, bringing the orbital laboratory’s crew size to five.

The mission is the last scheduled Russian flight carrying a U.S. crew member, marking an end to a long-held dependency as the U.S. revives its own crew launch capability in an effort to drive down the cost of sending astronauts to space.

Since the space shuttle program ended in 2011, NASA has relied on Russia to ferry its astronauts to the space station, an orbiting laboratory 250 miles (400 km) above Earth that has housed international crews of astronauts continuously for nearly 20 years.

The U.S. space agency in 2014 contracted Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Boeing Co to build competing space capsules in an effort to reclaim NASA’s launch independence. The $8 billion program enabled SpaceX’s first crewed trip to the space station in May, marking the first from home soil in nearly a decade.

NASA has bought additional crew seats from Russia as its public-private crew program faced delays – with Rubins’ $90.2 million mission being the most recent – and in July ceased negotiations to purchase more as the agency prepares to start operational missions in November using SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule.

“We have an incredible partnership,” Rubins said in an interview from Russia’s Star City before her flight. “We’ll continue to train crews over here and we’re going to have cosmonauts come to the Johnson Space Center and train.”

NASA and Roscosmos have committed to continue the flight-sharing partnership in exchange for flying Russian astronauts on U.S. vehicles and to fly U.S. astronauts on Russian rockets when needed, a spokesperson for Roscosmos told Reuters.

“Of course, mutual flights are of interest for ISS reliability and continuous operations,” the spokesperson said. “This approach (mixed crew flights) will ensure delivery of the crew to the station, should a problem with the partner spacecraft occur.”

Source link

- Advertisement -

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article

Twitter Now Supports Hardware Security Keys on Android and iOS

2020 was certainly not a great year for Twitter’s security team, case in point: the infamous high-profile Twitter Bitcoin scam. To recover from this...

FAU-G Records Over 1 Million Pre-Registrations in Just 24 Hours on Android

While the ministry is giving PUBG officials a cold shoulder, the game’s Atmanirbhar rival, FAU-G, is gearing up for a mammoth launch later this...

Apple to Release Mini LED MacBook Pro in 2021, MacBook Air in 2022: Kuo

We have heard about Apple working towards using Mini LED displays in its devices, including the MacBook Pro and MacBook Air. While earlier reports...