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Saturday, October 31, 2020

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra users face camera issues

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Over a hundred buyers of Samsung’s latest Galaxy Note 20 Ultra took to Samsung Forums on the first day itself to report a bunch of Camera issues. The problem was reportedly a batch of camera sensors that weren’t up to the mark. As per a report by SamMobile, a total of over 100 reports were filed until Thursday morning. Also Read – Samsung announces partnership with Logitech to offer video conferencing solutions

Some of the early reports even spotted dust particles and condensation droplets appearing on the wrong side of the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra’s camera module. Samsung is yet to acknowledge the widespread issue. Moreover, in a statement provided to local media in South Korea, a Samsung official said that minor water condensation effects, by themselves, aren’t evidence of a manufacturing defect and shouldn’t impact functionality. Also Read – Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra to feature new 108-megapixel sensor, 60W fast charging

Watch: Samsung Galaxy M31s Camera Review

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra survives durability test

In other news, the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra has come out to be a rather sturdy and durable smartphone from the brand. In a recent YouTube video by JerryRigEverything, the smartphone was put through its paces. However, the phone lasted pretty well. Also Read – Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra 5G First Impressions: Reaching a new level of premium

Similar to most smartphones using the Gorilla Glass 6 protection, the Ultra starts accumulating scratches with Level 6 Mohs. The Level 7 Mohs end up giving deeper grooves on the display. This isn’t as surprising given that glass has its limits to scratches. One should note that Samsung uses the Gorilla Glass Victus on the Ultra.

The scratch test also reveals that the camera lenses are scratch-resistant. Sadly, the aluminum sides are prone to scratches easily. The S Pen is made of plastic and that pride little integrity to its structure. Hence, it easily snaps into two with moderate pressure. Zach goes on to show the innards of the S Pen after completely peeling off the plastic shield.

The Ultra refuses to bend under extreme pressure, emphasizing its strong build quality. However, the burn test manages to damage the massive 6.9-inch AMOLED display easily. After almost a duration of 24 seconds, the screen gets permanently damaged after exposure to the flame.





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